Chiseling The Craft of Business

There are many woodworkers on my family tree.  I have an appreciation for the medium and for the work.  It is my delight to have a local woodworker as a friend and business buddy.


Ron Light creates wood furniture and accessories here in the Northern Shenandoah Valley.  About once a quarter we meet up in his workshop, a space with a view of the Blue Ridge that always distracts me until Ron offers me coffee. I get to preview his projects and then we get down to the talk.

Vendors, markets, price points.  We roll the topics around.  We question.  We disagree.  We suggest new products.  We share past experience. It is a pleasant process to keep ourselves in check.  I recommend this type of creative company for any self-employed maker of things and ideas.

Good conversation with Ron creates clarity for my work.  He is an excellent sounding board, as sure as the pieces he creates.  Learn more about him at lighthousewoodworking.com.

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Traveling In Spirals: Defining Artifact

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On the nights we eat spaghetti in front of the television, we carry out artisan crafted Waterford tables made by our friend Ron Light.

In our home these are artifacts, as is the antique table crafted by my husband’s father when he was in high school. We use these items in our daily lives. We admire the workmanship. We celebrate the makers.

Most of our furniture, dishes, and clothing are mass-produced. Utilitarian, attractive, but not in the artifact category. This is my own definition. Hand crafted. Utilitarian. Valued.

My email signature lists me as artist and artisan. I have made textiles into artifacts for over four decades. That gives me joy.

See Ron’s tables at lighthousewoodworking.com.