A Veiled Technique: Tulle Overlay

Three 12″ square studies, part of my exploration of compostion within a square.  Each of these pieces include the technique of a tulle overlay.  The tulle assists with construction and creates a muted tone.

The close ups show that the tulle is not always the final layer.  The grid stitching in the first selection and the diagonal lines stitched between sections of horizontal lines become essential elements in the composition.  The diagonal lines of paint applied over the tulle create an unexpected depth

 

 

 

Playing The Counter-Melody

 

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Both of these photos appeared on our fibergig Facebook timeline in September. Viewers commented that the products were quite disparate.  Perhaps not many studios create a runway garment and a spiritual mural in the same summer. Actually, I use the same techniques to create all of my work.  Often the role of the work itself is the same.

I designed the organdy black cape and several other garments for a runway show, in which several members of my Seeking Stars Art team were featured. The garments were to showcase jewelry and to energize the movement of the models.  They played a beautiful counter-melody to the primary players.

A congregation in Texas commissioned the large mural for its fellowship space.  In the photo, the visiting bishop address the faith community about its vision for the future. Behind him, the mural is a visual reminder of the constancy of the Christian Trinity. It plays a silent counter-melody, fully supporting the message.

I learned counter-melody in high school band, when I played the euphonium.  Trombones to the left and tubas to the right blew out harmony and rhythm.  Trumpets in front tooted the melody.  But our small section, along with a few woodwinds, often had the task of enriching the sound with a secondary tune. Perhaps this is where my love of complexity began.

 

The Tag Tells

 Fibergig is adding new tags to our scarves, garments, and stoles.  We always check the fiber content of fabric and yarn before they are put to use.  Fiber content often limits which techniques we can use in fabrication. It determines best options for paint, dye, pressing heat, and needle style.

Fiber content gives clues about how the article will feel and how to care for it. We want you to know more.

The new tags are photographed here with a small art piece which celebrates the touch of cotton, linen, silk, and wool.  Look for the new tags on items available online at Seeking Stars Art and Fibergig.  Our homepage includes buttons to get you there.

Rain Maker

My local fabric art guild does a monthly study on a given topic.  “Sky” was a prompt recently.  Avoiding blue, I chose black polyester organza screen printed with a bit of gray. I cut and applied abstract shapes from hand dyed and painted fabrics for clouds and lightning. Then I was stumped on rain.

I dipped a plastic wall scraper into metallic paint.  Applied repeatedly at an angle, the paint lines quickly created driving rain for my stormy night.

I always set a time limit on the monthly studies.  This boundary can be a catalyst for discovering new uses for tools and materials.  How would you use a scraper?  How would you make rain?

Traveling in Spirals: Working Small

I found this forgotten treasure of 5″ by 7″ mats, painted fabric backgrounds matched and in place, in a supply closet last week.  A few days later my sister shared information about CreativeSprint.  I am blending the two together for an April visit into working small.

I first used this format three years ago.  I added cut, fused fabric shapes to the painted background. Stitched accents created a third step to the process.

I will share daily the results of the Sprint.  I am curious what the cumulative gallery and process will be.  I plan to enjoy this visit to small dimensions.

Traveling in Spirals: Size Matters

tape and glovesI stood behind the receiving table for an art quilt exhibit wearing white gloves and holding a tape measure and a seam guide.


It was my responsibility to check for accurate quilt size and the position and construction of the hanging sleeve. I requested each entrant to place submitted work flat, with the back side facing up. I wanted to quickly and accurately measure, inspect, and approve. The artists provided a variety of responses to my efforts. Oddly, gratitude was rarely one of them.


I appreciate a good proof reader and an honest critic in the process of making art that will be shared beyond my safe circle. Correct size and standard hanging arrangements help to insure an attractive display. I never want to be the one 19″ square in a room full of 18″ square quilts.

A Surface Design Tool

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This week’s studio work includes using products from one of our fellow Etsy shops, PG Fiber2Art. They market thermofax screens which are great for applying painted design to paper or fabric. We had the BOLD made for our new fiber tags. We ordered our fibergig name in two sizes, one for bags and one for garment labels.

Please visit their shop. You will be inspired.