Design for a Specific Space

Creating art work for a specific environment can offer the opportunity to use new sizes and proportions.  The client wanted pulpit frontals that picked up colors in the stained glass, that did not obscure the cross in the pulpit, and that complemented the chapel furnishings.

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dedication of chapel paraments

The results include bold cross designs in fresh proportions and hemmed with a curve that echoes the art over the altar. During regular worship services, only one frontal is used.  The frontals are crafted from easy care cottons that can be washed or dry-cleaned. It is always my hope that worshippers will feel free to touch the tactile expressions of faith.

 

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Hooking Yarn

Hooking yarn

The Fibergig portion of Studio Three 17 is a partnership between myself and my daughter Emily.  She holds the reins on marketing, social media, and technology while managing her own work which includes working at Bella Filati, her hometown yarn shop.  When she reported a creative block for a project design, I suggested that I help out, providing I could crochet, not knit.

I designed this Harvest Trivet to protect wood tables. As I photographed the near completed project, I discovered the combined textures of wood, wool, and pottery.  Yarn and design for the trivet will be available at the yarn shop (bellafilati.com) in October.  The bowl is a product of Center Ring Designs; see more of Diane’s work at centeringdesign.com.

Emily and I usually express our partnership through each one completing the tasks in her department.  Helping each other outside of our assigned duties is an expansive cross training.  Who encourages you to try new things?  Who helps you with creative block?

 

 

Three Jersey Jackets

Autumn arrives. Brisk days call for a layer of warmth and comfort;  welcome a rayon jersey jacket to your wardrobe.

In this dye session, I used subtle stenciled pattern to add artistic interest. Clients remark that they like the flattering placement of pattern in my clothing.

Do you like interest at the yoke and collar,  the quiet comfort of an all over texture, or a jazzy bit over the hips,?

Joy of Making: Knots

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Custom work filled many summer days at the studio this year.  Completed projects are now delivered. Before I completely shift into next season’s work, my hands and mind are revisiting techniques and tools: a bit like a family reunion.

Grandma Alice showed me how to tie quilts when I was a teenager.  My fingers readily repeat the old motions. I enjoy adding this simple bit of thread into textile art. Seen here, knots added to wall hanging  used in the worship space of The Legacy, Staunton, VA.

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Temptation Or Trial

 This composition is based on the petition from The Lord’s Prayer, save us from the time of trial.  As a child I was taught, save us from temptation.  Having lived through a life altering trial, I prefer the more contemporary version.

I selected the image for this week as Christians near the observance of Holy Week.  I am also studying it more closely for how I placed the elements in the square frame.

I am sharing it online, as a reminder to us all to seek justice, love kindness, and to walk humbly. That focus may be some ease to our own trials and temptations.

A Veiled Technique: Tulle Overlay

Three 12″ square studies, part of my exploration of compostion within a square.  Each of these pieces include the technique of a tulle overlay.  The tulle assists with construction and creates a muted tone.

The close ups show that the tulle is not always the final layer.  The grid stitching in the first selection and the diagonal lines stitched between sections of horizontal lines become essential elements in the composition.  The diagonal lines of paint applied over the tulle create an unexpected depth

 

 

 

Playing The Counter-Melody

 

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Both of these photos appeared on our fibergig Facebook timeline in September. Viewers commented that the products were quite disparate.  Perhaps not many studios create a runway garment and a spiritual mural in the same summer. Actually, I use the same techniques to create all of my work.  Often the role of the work itself is the same.

I designed the organdy black cape and several other garments for a runway show, in which several members of my Seeking Stars Art team were featured. The garments were to showcase jewelry and to energize the movement of the models.  They played a beautiful counter-melody to the primary players.

A congregation in Texas commissioned the large mural for its fellowship space.  In the photo, the visiting bishop address the faith community about its vision for the future. Behind him, the mural is a visual reminder of the constancy of the Christian Trinity. It plays a silent counter-melody, fully supporting the message.

I learned counter-melody in high school band, when I played the euphonium.  Trombones to the left and tubas to the right blew out harmony and rhythm.  Trumpets in front tooted the melody.  But our small section, along with a few woodwinds, often had the task of enriching the sound with a secondary tune. Perhaps this is where my love of complexity began.

 

A Fresh Silk Scarf

“This feels good! What is it?”

“Raw silk.”

“But it is not slippery. It feels so soft.”

This conversation was repeated at every 2014 craft market where I sold my L-shaped wraps.  This week the light came on in the connection closet of my brain. Why am I not making scarves from raw silk? And here they are! Prototypes with colorful dye and paint and also an elegant interpretation with black paint on the neutral silk.

I use a small 1 inch fringed hem on the short ends to create a soft edge without fussiness; the long sides are double turned and stitched. They measure approximately 17 by 70″.  A raw silk scarf can become an all season star: tucked under a coat collar, tossed over shoulders as a wrap, or twirled to create a spectacular neckline.

They are not yet on the market, but will appear early in January 2016.  Look for them at Seeking Stars Art.

A Chasuble Returns to the Studio

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Occasionally my work returns to me for an adjustment or repair. The chasubles made for the chapel at The Village at Orchard Ridge were lined in slippery fabric, so that they hang away from the pastor’s alb.

 

The Chaplin reported that they slipped backward during worship, becoming uncomfortable. We devised a solution of cotton “patches” added to the shoulder area. Future chasubles will have a yoke lining of non-slippery fabric .

It is always a joy for me to participate in dialogue that increases the effectiveness of my work. I also enjoy the opportunity to touch and see what has gone into service.
I began my professional life doing garment alterations while a college student. I am pleased to still include craftsmanship and individual attention in my toolbox of skills.image

The Tag Tells

 Fibergig is adding new tags to our scarves, garments, and stoles.  We always check the fiber content of fabric and yarn before they are put to use.  Fiber content often limits which techniques we can use in fabrication. It determines best options for paint, dye, pressing heat, and needle style.

Fiber content gives clues about how the article will feel and how to care for it. We want you to know more.

The new tags are photographed here with a small art piece which celebrates the touch of cotton, linen, silk, and wool.  Look for the new tags on items available online at Seeking Stars Art and Fibergig.  Our homepage includes buttons to get you there.